Access Intelligence

How To Save Money When You're Dealing With A High Restaurant Turnover Rate

Posted by Shelly Vollmer, M.A. on Mar 14, 2017 10:20:14 AM in Access Intelligence | 0 Comments

Securing restaurant facilities takes up a huge chunk of time, money and human resources. So
much so that if you are in charge of restaurant operations you’re constantly looking for a way to focus more on making sure guests have a fantastic experience and less on who’s got access to a restaurant location and its vulnerable assets. In order to achieve this in the most efficient and cost effective way, take a cue from the boy scouts: be prepared.


High Restaurant Turnover Rate.pngThe turnover rate in the hospitality segment of the economy was 72.1 percent in 2015, according to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics. Think about that. Nearly three out of four employees hired in one year will no longer be employed at the same restaurant in the next year. Acknowledging this prompts a rethinking of the common protocol for securing restaurant facilities.

Those in charge of restaurant operations are surely aware of the costs associated with a high turnover rate. Not only are there significant costs associated with continuously hiring and training new employees, but there are peripheral costs that aren’t often recognized and discussed in the popular discourse on the topic. High turnover rates directly affect the cost of keeping restaurant facilities secure. But, knowing this is not reflected in the typical process of securing a facility after an employee’s departure.

The process for ensuring security at most restaurant facilities looks like this:

  1. Employee is separated.
  2. The facility’s security is evaluated by asking the question, “What did this employee have access to?”
  3. Once the employee’s access level is known, keys are asked to be returned.
  4. Locks are changed in the event that employee does not return keys.
  5. Access codes are changed.

This process is reactive rather than proactive. Being reactive is a result of being unprepared. Being prepared for employee separation will allow restaurant ops leaders to combat the high cost of securing facilities. These high costs often lie in the result of steps three and four in the process outlined above. There are three changes that can be made should be made to prepare facilities for such situations and reduce costs. 

  1. Establishing an employee retention program can make a big impact to reduce the turnover rate before it becomes a serious strain on your budget.
  2. During the employee onboarding process, consider creating a key log that documents the keys that a new employee is issued and what those keys access. Keys can be easily documented if they can be imprinted with a tracking number. This can help ensure that when keys are returned they have not been duplicated. But, lots of people can procure engravers. What is also important to do is to use keys that don’t have key blanks used widely in the open market, also known as restricted keys. This offers a double layer of security for keyed entries. If restaurant leaders can ensure that keys have not been duplicated, locks don’t need to be changed each time an employee is separated, which will save substantial dollars each year.
  3. To fully ensure that a location’s keyed entry points have not been compromised, locks should be repinned or lock cylinders should be replaced for each employee separation event. This best practice typically comes at a premium cost, but it is absolutely worth it when you consider what could be at stake. Unfortunately, this cost is prohibitive for many smaller restaurant chains and franchise locations. The good news is that in the long run, this cost can be reduced with rekeyable locks. With these locks, restaurant management can change the locks themselves, which would make a big impact on the cost of locksmith callouts and hardware. This would also eliminate the time it takes for a technician to get to a location, thereby closing the risk window between employee separation and securing the location.

The bottom line is, employees are going to leave; about three quarters of them. What are you doing to prepare your locations for this to happen? Lock and key systems are often overlooked in the conversation on the costs of a high employee turnover rate – forgotten until a security event brings the importance of these considerations to the forefront in the form of a loss. But, that won’t happen to you, as long as you’re prepared.

 

We offer free consultations on how to save money with rekeyable lock technology. Click below to get started!

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Lock Change or Rekey: Which One Should You Choose?

Posted by InstaKey on Mar 8, 2017 8:00:00 AM in Access Intelligence | 0 Comments

lock change or rekey.png

When a key is lost or stolen, you need to take action right away to keep your building secure. Rekeying and changing your locks are two similar options that you can use to secure your building in this situation and ensure that all employees can access the areas they need to go to in the course of their everyday work. As you are about to find out in this post, rekeyable door lock systems have many advantages, allowing you to avoid replacing hardware unless it is very worn out or you decide to switch to a different vendor. Let's take a look at the best practices for lock changes and rekeying to help you decide what is the best option for your business.

Rekey Locks Under These Circumstances

rekeyablelocks.jpgThe number one situation that causes business owners to consider rekeying their locks is when they lose control of who has access to their business premises. For example, if there has been a change in staffing in your organization, you may worry that ex-employees still have copies of keys, which could be the original keys you provided or copies the employees have made for themselves. If any former employee holds a grudge against your business, they could potentially use their keys to gain access to the building, steal goods, or cause criminal damage, which could then lead to significant costs for your organization. You may find it difficult to file an insurance claim in this situation, as you gave the key to the employee who caused the damage. Rekeying your locks when a staff member leaves the organization can remove the risk of this situation arising and therefore give you peace of mind.

Lost keys are also a major concern for businesses that need to keep their physical premises secure, and they can also be a very common occurrence when you have multiple employees who all hold keys for your business premises. You never know whose hands a lost set of keys could end up in, so you need to act fast to rekey locks in this situation to ensure the security of your business.

Some locks allow you to rekey them yourself, simply by inserting a step change key and turning it 180 degrees to change the lock configuration. This very quick and easy procedure makes all previous keys unusable. If you already have these kinds of  installed, rekeying is almost always a better option than replacing your locks, as it avoids the cost of calling out a locksmith and can usually be completed very quickly, therefore minimizing the time during which your business faces a security risk from lost or stolen keys. In most situations, you should use this convenient solution rather than changing your locks.

Change Locks Under These Circumstances

Despite the advantages of rekeying rather than replacing locks in most circumstances, there are certain situations when you will need to change your locks instead of simply rekeying them. For most businesses, the two situations that would cause them to change their locking system hardware include replacing worn out hardware and changing to a different security system or security vendor. In all other commercial and retail situations, there is simply no need to replace hardware.

A good reason to change your locks is worn out hardware. If the components of your lock are simply too worn to be rekeyed, you may need to replace your locks instead of rekeying them. When you replace your locks, consider installing units that have small format interchangeable cores (SFIC) to cut down on hardware replacement costs in the future. Using this kind of core allows you to change only the core of the lock, not the whole unit, when the locking mechanism begins to wear out.

keySolutions.pngAnother good reason to change your locks is because you want to upgrade to a better security system. For example, you may want to upgrade from basic locks to an electronic door lock system. This locking system provides features that allow business owners to conveniently manage all locks and keys. For example, InstaKey’s door lock system comes with cloud-based software, which allows managers or business owners to track the locations of all keys and quickly see which locks they provide access to. When a key is lost or stolen, this kind of system makes it easy to rekey locks and reset keys held by employees, therefore ensuring the security of the property without business owners having to worry about disturbing the day to day running of the organization.

If you need more help in deciding whether to rekey or replace your locks, get in touch with InstaKey for more information. We can help you learn more about rekeyable lock technology and give you detailed advice about upgrading your business’s security with a better lock system. Explain your situation and find out whether you need to simply rekey your system or whether it is time to replace your hardware. Contact us today to find out how we can help.

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Rekeying Locks vs. Rekeyable Locks: Which is better?

Posted by InstaKey on Feb 20, 2017 8:00:00 AM in | 0 Comments

Rekeying Locks vs. Rekeyable Locks.png

Here's an alarming statistic: A burglary takes place every 18 seconds in the United States. That may have you worried about your business or organization's security. 

Obviously, a perfect world without theft is impossible. But what's the key to reducing the amount of break-ins? It's better keys (and locks).

Whether you're handling loss prevention at a retail store, managing physical assets at public buildings or trying to cut operational costs at a factory, you need the most secured key systems on the market. It's how you can protect your assets, reduce shrink and theft, and lower security costs.

If you've already done some research, you may be deciding between rekeying locks and rekeyable locks. Discussed here is all you need to know to decide which one is better for your business.

The Truth About Rekeying Locks

lock_and_key.jpgThere are many reasons to upgrade your lock system. A recent break-in certainly necessitates improving security (and improving lock systems). Losing a set of the master keys does, too. If you've just opened up a new storefront or want greater security at a production plant, then you should be thinking about changing the locks. Whatever the reason is, you always should be making sure the place is as secure as possible.

One option you may consider is rekeying locks. To rekey locks, you or a handyman professional would have to remove the locks and replace them with lock patterns that match the new keys.

This sounds simple but actually is time-consuming and can get costly, as you have to pay for labor and buy new equipment. If you are managing a big facility where there are lots of doors to secure, this can be even more costly.

There is no greater cautionary example than perhaps what happened at the College of William and Mary. When a set of master keys was lost, the college had to rekey locks in all 80 campus residential buildings. The cost of this was almost $400,000 (yes, you read that number right). Overall, the school had to remove and replace 3,000 lock cores — and that's incredibly expensive.

Rekeyable Locks

While rekeying locks certainly makes a facility secure, it takes a long time and is expensive. Many businesses, organizations and municipalities simply can't afford it. Thankfully, there is a cheaper and more efficient way to change a lock system: rekeyable locks.

The way rekeyable locks work is ingenious. These locks are designed to be changed with just one turn of a key. Through what is called a "step change" method, locks can be changed without removing or replacing any hardware.

Here's a step-by-step guide of what you have to do. A professional isn't even needed, which saves you even more money:

  1. Insert a notched step key into the cylinder. Turn it 180 degrees, which displaces the wafer and renders previous keys useless.
  2. Turn the key to disengage and capture wafers. This is how the rekeying process is implemented.
  3. Return the key to its original position to create a modified pin. By removing wafers from different stacks in different chambers, you can change the lock at any level. This essentially gives you the ability to have a seemingly endless amount of ways to construct a key, which makes copying impossible.
  4. Set the key and let the cylinder reload a new and totally different lock combination.
  5. Extract the key. You are finished. 

After the rekey, the original master key will not be able to enter the building. It is useless to the thief or whoever finds it. Yes, it's as simple and effective as it sounds.

The benefits of such innovative technology are amazing, as no new hardware is required and you don't have to hire a handyman, which can be pricey. You can improve and update your lock systems very quickly and at a fraction of the cost (in comparison to rekeying locks). Whether you're trying to reduce loss at a clothing store or stop robberies at a school, rekeyable lock can come in handy.

rekeyablelocks.jpgOn top of all that, with many rekeyable locks, you can be sent new keys very quickly. For instance, if you get your locks and keys from InstaKey, you just have to notify the company when your keys are lost or stolen. InstaKey will expedite shipping of new keys to you so that security at your facility doesn't miss a beat.

If you're choosing between rekeying locks and rekeyable locks, the answer should be clear. In the long run, it is much more beneficiary to have rekeyable locks. It gives you the flexibility and cost efficiency you need. 

When it comes down to it, you don't have to be a victim of theft, because we have the services and new technology available to help you. Our leading rekeyable lock technology gives you peace of mind, ensuring your business or organization is secure 24/7. Contact us to learn more about utilizing rekeyable locks today.

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5 Questions You Should Ask Before Installing A Door Lock System

Posted by InstaKey on Feb 15, 2017 8:00:00 AM in Access Intelligence | 0 Comments

5 Questions You Should Ask Before Installing a Door Lock System.png

The InstaKey Key Control Program can improve security, while helping to control costs and minimizing your business liability. In order to reap all these benefits, you will need to ensure you choose the right lock and key security system for your organization and use it correctly. Before you install a door lock system, ask yourself the following questions to clarify your organization’s security needs and work out which solution is right for you.

1. What Is a Door Lock System?

Before you install a new system in your facility, you need to know how it works. Mechanical solutions for securing access to a property have existed for centuries and they haven’t changed much because they are very effective. In just the past 30 years, small changes to traditional lock pinning practices have made a huge impact on locks making them more efficient and less costly to maintain. Let’s take a look at the four critical components of a key control system.

Rekeyable Locks

cabinet_lock_for_constant_contact.jpgIn the past, a lost or stolen key used to mean having to call out a locksmith to replace the lock and secure the property. A rekeyable lock makes it possible to immediately reset locks if a key is lost or stolen.

Restricted, Serialized Keys

Each keyholder receives a key with an individual serial number that allows you to trace the key back to its owner. These keys can’t be duplicated without permission. Therefore, when you use these keys, you’ll always know exactly how many of them are in circulation and which employees they have been assigned to. As keys are returned when employees leave, there is no need to change the locks on the property because you know keys have not been duplicated.

Cloud-Based Key Tracking Software

Cloud-based software allows system administrators to track serialized keys by location and see at a glance which locks the keys can unlock. The software also provides dashboard reporting, which can give a broad overview of your key control program.

Full Program Administration

If you need support in managing your system, you can take advantage of the full program administration service. Our clients are assigned a single point of contact, which means you can be sure that help is always close at hand.

2. Is It Easy to Control and Maintain?

Before you install any new system for managing locks and keys, you need to know how much time you can expect to spend maintaining it. Thankfully, these systems are easy to control and maintain. Online software provides compliance by allowing you to track keyholders and ensuring that you know who has the keys and that they are all present. When you need to reset a lock, you can quickly do this without needing to replace any physical components other than keys.

3. Can I Customize My Door Lock System?

You might worry that due to complexity, no product can meet the needs of your organization. However, you can customize InstaKey systems so they work just as you need them to. Rekeyable lock cylinders that retrofit into most existing hardware, online/mobile software and restricted keys all provide customization options even up to a great grandmaster key level of complexity, ensures that you give access to everyone who needs it, where they need it.

4. What Are the Benefits of Adding a Door Lock System?

To convince your company stakeholders to invest in a key control system, you’ll need to clearly explain the benefits. There are three main reasons to invest in this kind of system.

Better Security

RekeyableLocksShadowed.pngInvesting in a more secure locking system can minimize your organization’s liability, as well as eliminating management issues that can open up holes in your security. In today’s world of regulations and risks, it’s important to take steps to keep your business’s liability as low as possible.

Controlled Costs

Good security doesn’t have to mean spiraling costs. Once you’ve invested in a key control system, the ongoing maintenance and administration costs are low. Of course, you have to weigh the costs of installing a key control system with the potential costs that could result from theft of important equipment or data.

Convenience

Think about the time you spend replacing lock cylinders and cores or waiting for locksmiths to change locks on your behalf. Rekeyable locks eliminate these inefficiencies, allowing your business to carry on operating as usual even if an employee loses a key.

5. How Much Does It Cost?

Understandably, questions about cost are always at the forefront of a business owner’s mind when considering new products or services. While it’s true that there are costs involved in installing rekeyable locks and issuing restricted keys to employees, these costs can result in a quick return on investment. Of course, the cost of installing a complete system will vary depending on the size of your organization and the number of doors you need to secure. For a detailed estimate of costs, get in touch with InstaKey to discuss your unique requirements.

Now that you have asked yourself these five questions, you should have a better understanding of the effect a door lock system could have on your organization. If you think this kind of system could help to improve your security, while keeping costs under control, get in touch with InstaKey for a free consultation. We take individual factors into account to determine your needs and estimate the potential savings you could make by adding a key control system.

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Consistency In Your Key Systems

Posted by InstaKey on Sep 28, 2015 5:20:11 AM in Access Intelligence | 0 Comments

Authored by Whitney Fay, Marketing Administrator at LockNet
 
If you’re the lucky person who has to keep track of the various keys throughout multiple facilities and your store doesn’t use a key system, you might be ready to pull your hair out. Without a key system you have to handle the organization and tracking of multiple keys in multiple openings and none of that has to be consistent. So, while you may have one key cut in one particular opening, you may have a completely different one in another store down the street. This can cause a lot of undue stress. This is where key systems come in.
 
Benefits of Consistent Key Systems
There are several benefits when you install a key system within your facilities, but the number one benefit we hear from customers is how much more organized their work life becomes once a key system is put into place.
 
Home Base
No matter what region each facility is in, with a key system there is only one office that needs to be called for all key issues. While it might not seem like that big of a deal, this is monumental in saving your facility manager time. This eliminates multiple calls to various locksmiths to try and get a key replaced, the search for what key cut was used, etc.
 
More Security
The amount of security at your facility might not be up to par if you don’t work with a key system and you have a high turnover with employees. If an employee leaves the company or is fired, they may take their key with them and that leaves the facility vulnerable. This can require an entire rekey of your facility which is will cost money you probably don’t want to spend. However, with a key system all of the information is managed and tracked, which in return, makes the replacement of a key a simple task as opposed to one that’s going to steal a lot of your time and patience.
 
Simpler Repair
Without a key system, you have to deal with a various amount of parts for openings throughout your facility. This can add time onto repairs if a locksmith or tech has to search for the specific parts. Tack on the amount of time to order and receive the parts and you might be ready to give up on anything ever involved with door hardware from the stress of it all. That’s where a key system comes in. A key system brings consistency and consistency will bring you stress relief. All parts will be the same which will make the repair process much easier and less time consuming. No one can be mad about that. Overall, a key system makes the security of your facility a much more manageable monster and who can say no to that?
 
The original version of this post can be found at LockBytes.

Consistency In Your Key Systems

Posted by InstaKey on Sep 28, 2015 5:20:11 AM in Access Intelligence | 0 Comments

Authored by Whitney Fay, Marketing Administrator at LockNet
 
If you’re the lucky person who has to keep track of the various keys throughout multiple facilities and your store doesn’t use a key system, you might be ready to pull your hair out. Without a key system you have to handle the organization and tracking of multiple keys in multiple openings and none of that has to be consistent. So, while you may have one key cut in one particular opening, you may have a completely different one in another store down the street. This can cause a lot of undue stress. This is where key systems come in.
 
 
Benefits of Consistent Key Systems
There are several benefits when you install a key system within your facilities, but the number one benefit we hear from customers is how much more organized their work life becomes once a key system is put into place.
 
Home Base
No matter what region each facility is in, with a key system there is only one office that needs to be called for all key issues. While it might not seem like that big of a deal, this is monumental in saving your facility manager time. This eliminates multiple calls to various locksmiths to try and get a key replaced, the search for what key cut was used, etc.
 
More Security
The amount of security at your facility might not be up to par if you don’t work with a key system and you have a high turnover with employees. If an employee leaves the company or is fired, they may take their key with them and that leaves the facility vulnerable. This can require an entire rekey of your facility which is will cost money you probably don’t want to spend. However, with a key system all of the information is managed and tracked, which in return, makes the replacement of a key a simple task as opposed to one that’s going to steal a lot of your time and patience.
 
Simpler Repair
Without a key system, you have to deal with a various amount of parts for openings throughout your facility. This can add time onto repairs if a locksmith or tech has to search for the specific parts. Tack on the amount of time to order and receive the parts and you might be ready to give up on anything ever involved with door hardware from the stress of it all. That’s where a key system comes in. A key system brings consistency and consistency will bring you stress relief. All parts will be the same which will make the repair process much easier and less time consuming. No one can be mad about that. Overall, a key system makes the security of your facility a much more manageable monster and who can say no to that?
 
The original version of this post can be found at LockBytes.

Code Violations: What You Should Know

Posted by InstaKey on Jun 18, 2015 7:06:46 AM in Access Intelligence | 0 Comments

Authored by Katie Miller, Director of Marketing at LockNet

 

LockNet’s Service Manager would regularly field calls from technicians in which they would call with concerns about code violations they saw in the field. Once, a technician sent this picture in:
 
messy-stock-room

If you are a Facilities Manager, I bet your blood would start to boil if you realized one of your locations had a stock room that looked like this. Not only is it completely disorganized and a great way to lose inventory, it is also a huge safety hazard.

NFPA life safety code requires that all exits be clear and accessible. You would be hard pressed to get out of this room in an emergency.

Unfortunately, this is not the only type of issue we see. There are many different types of code violations that our technicians come across on a daily basis.

 

What Are The Codes For Doors and Locks?

 

The two main families of codes that you need to concern yourself with are ADA codes and NFPA life safety code.

ADA code dictates things such as the type of lock sets and deadbolts you can use, where viewing windows must be positioned, and the ease with which doors should open.

NFPA life safety code covers topics that ranging from the proper use of delayed egress hardware to fire-rated doors.

Both sets of codes are extensive and can be a bit cumbersome to get through. To give you a head start, we have compiled a list of some of the most common code violations we come across.

 

Five Common Code Violations

 

  1. Improper Application of Delayed Egress Hardware

Delayed egress hardware is a great way to deter theft. However, before you install it, be sure you brush up on all of the rules and regulations in regards to its proper application.

For instance, if the delayed egress hardware isn’t tied directly into your fire system, you will get nailed with fines from your local fire marshal. This is because the doors need to allow immediate egress in the event of an emergency.

If you want to install delayed egress hardware, be sure to check with your local Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) to get the green light. If you have multiple locations across the region, you will need to confer with each jurisdiction’s AHJ. Some may allow it, and some may not.

 

  1. Blocked Exits

This is one of the most common code violations we see. NFPA code mandates that all exits are both clear and accessible.

It’s very easy for employees to leave a box, cart, or trash in front of an exit door. It’s important to make employees aware of the liability this causes, both safety-wise and finance-wise.

 

  1. Locked Exits

Just as exits must be clear and accessible, they must also be unlocked during business hours.

If you have an exit door you feel needs additional security, do not install auxiliary locking hardware. Instead, install alarms or delayed egress hardware (if allowed). There are numerous ways to increase security of exit doors without creating code violations.

 

  1. Knob Lock Sets

ADA code 404.2.7 requires that lock sets have a “shape that is easy to grasp with one hand without requiring tight grasping or twisting of the wrist to operate.” This means no knob lock, as Knob sets require both tight grasping and twisting of the wrist.

Instead, install lever sets. To operate a lever, you simply need to depress the lever, so no special operation is required.

 

  1. Improper Mag Lock Application

Like delayed egress hardware, mag locks have a host of restrictions. There are numerous codes and regulations in regards to mag locks.

Mag locks can be a little tricky when it comes to complying with code. If your local Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) allows you to install a mag lock, he/she will require electrical plans and permits.

With a multitude of codes, finding appropriate applications for a mag lock can be a little difficult. They work really well when it comes to integration into access control systems as well as in facilities that don’t handle a lot of free egress. Detention centers and correctional facilities are two examples of facilities where mag locks would work well.

That said, if you strongly feel that a mag lock is the right hardware for your facility, check with your local AHJ(s) to ensure it is allowed.

 

Now is a great time to check out your facilities for these code violations. Are there other violations you come across? We’d love to hear about them and what you did to resolve them!

A version of this post originally appeared on LockNet’s blog, LockBytes.

Code Violations: What You Should Know

Posted by InstaKey on Jun 18, 2015 7:06:46 AM in Access Intelligence | 0 Comments

Authored by Katie Miller, Director of Marketing at LockNet

 

LockNet’s Service Manager would regularly field calls from technicians in which they would call with concerns about code violations they saw in the field. Once, a technician sent this picture in:
messy-stock-room

If you are a Facilities Manager, I bet your blood would start to boil if you realized one of your locations had a stock room that looked like this. Not only is it completely disorganized and a great way to lose inventory, it is also a huge safety hazard.

NFPA life safety code requires that all exits be clear and accessible. You would be hard pressed to get out of this room in an emergency.

Unfortunately, this is not the only type of issue we see. There are many different types of code violations that our technicians come across on a daily basis.

 

What Are The Codes For Doors and Locks?

 The two main families of codes that you need to concern yourself with are ADA codes and NFPA life safety code.

ADA code dictates things such as the type of lock sets and deadbolts you can use, where viewing windows must be positioned, and the ease with which doors should open.

NFPA life safety code covers topics that ranging from the proper use of delayed egress hardware to fire-rated doors.

Both sets of codes are extensive and can be a bit cumbersome to get through. To give you a head start, we have compiled a list of some of the most common code violations we come across.

 

Five Common Code Violations

  1. Improper Application of Delayed Egress Hardware

Delayed egress hardware is a great way to deter theft. However, before you install it, be sure you brush up on all of the rules and regulations in regards to its proper application.

For instance, if the delayed egress hardware isn’t tied directly into your fire system, you will get nailed with fines from your local fire marshal. This is because the doors need to allow immediate egress in the event of an emergency.

If you want to install delayed egress hardware, be sure to check with your local Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) to get the green light. If you have multiple locations across the region, you will need to confer with each jurisdiction’s AHJ. Some may allow it, and some may not.

  1. Blocked Exits

This is one of the most common code violations we see. NFPA code mandates that all exits are both clear and accessible.

It’s very easy for employees to leave a box, cart, or trash in front of an exit door. It’s important to make employees aware of the liability this causes, both safety-wise and finance-wise.

  1. Locked Exits

Just as exits must be clear and accessible, they must also be unlocked during business hours.

If you have an exit door you feel needs additional security, do not install auxiliary locking hardware. Instead, install alarms or delayed egress hardware (if allowed). There are numerous ways to increase security of exit doors without creating code violations.

  1. Knob Lock Sets

ADA code 404.2.7 requires that lock sets have a “shape that is easy to grasp with one hand without requiring tight grasping or twisting of the wrist to operate.” This means no knob lock, as Knob sets require both tight grasping and twisting of the wrist.

Instead, install lever sets. To operate a lever, you simply need to depress the lever, so no special operation is required.

  1. Improper Mag Lock Application

Like delayed egress hardware, mag locks have a host of restrictions. There are numerous codes and regulations in regards to mag locks.

Mag locks can be a little tricky when it comes to complying with code. If your local Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) allows you to install a mag lock, he/she will require electrical plans and permits.

With a multitude of codes, finding appropriate applications for a mag lock can be a little difficult. They work really well when it comes to integration into access control systems as well as in facilities that don’t handle a lot of free egress. Detention centers and correctional facilities are two examples of facilities where mag locks would work well.

That said, if you strongly feel that a mag lock is the right hardware for your facility, check with your local AHJ(s) to ensure it is allowed.

Now is a great time to check out your facilities for these code violations. Are there other violations you come across? We’d love to hear about them and what you did to resolve them!

A version of this post originally appeared on LockNet’s blog, LockBytes.

Mechanical vs. Digital Keys – The Pros and Cons

Posted by InstaKey on Apr 30, 2015 3:59:16 AM in Access Intelligence | 0 Comments

Authored by Whitney Fay, Sales & Marketing Administrator for LockNet

Digital Keys:  Are They The New Future?

If you look around, you will notice more and more people use digital keys; they are definitely the wave of the future. I’m continually amazed by the new smart locks that and technological advances in today’s market.

With digital keys on the rise, many say mechanical keys will soon become a thing of the past. However, most industry professionals disagree.

Digital Keys: The Downsides

Digital keys have taken the market by storm and are definitely here to stay. They offer a host of benefits such as audit trails, simple rekeys, and ease of use. However, these advances aren’t without a few downsides:

  • Cost
  • Battery Life
  • Failure Rate

Both the locks that use digital keys, as well as the keys themselves, inevitably cost more than those that only use mechanical keys. The increased dollar signs alone are enough to encourage some organizations to opt for mechanical locks.

Another potential downside of digital keys is they must be physically charged or have the batteries changed on a regular basis. Imagine trying to get into your office only to find that your key is inoperable because it’s low on battery.

The final vulnerability of digital keys is the technology is more prone to failure than mechanical locks. Digital keys and the locks they operate are sometimes plagued by defective computer chips. In these instances, one cannot gain entry or secure the lock without a mechanical key override.

Mechanical Keys: They are Here to Stay

Because of the aforementioned downsides of digital keys, industry experts believe that, while the use digital keys will continue to rise, mechanical keys are here to stay. They are a safeguard against electronic failures and are easier to use.

As long as a lock functions properly, a mechanical key will always work—you don’t have the same risk for electronic failure. As such, many electronic locks will continue to offer mechanical key overrides. The LockNet director of business development, Elise Miller, says, “There will always be a need for at least one mechanical key per location, because there will always be at least one lock that needs an override. In other words, there will always be locks that need the most basic and simple operation—a key.”

Rob Owen, the LockNet director of national accounts-construction, is also on board with the idea mechanical keys are here to stay. “Digital keys are definitely here to stay, but by no means will they replace mechanical keys. First, some doors simply won’t need the sophistication of a digital key, and it would be a waste of money to install digital locks on these doors. Secondly, digital keys will always be plagued by a higher failure rate due to the ability for the computer chip to fail.”

As technology advances, digital keys will be increasingly refined and will be more of a mainstay in the market; however, the mechanical key is here to stay.

A version of this post originally appeared on the LockNet blog, LockBytes.

 

Mechanical vs. Digital Keys – The Pros and Cons

Posted by InstaKey on Apr 30, 2015 3:59:16 AM in Access Intelligence | 0 Comments

Authored by Whitney Fay, Sales & Marketing Administrator for LockNet

Digital Keys: Are They The New Future?

If you look around, you will notice more and more people use digital keys; they are definitely the wave of the future. I’m continually amazed by the new smart locks that and technological advances in today’s market.

With digital keys on the rise, many say mechanical keys will soon become a thing of the past. However, most industry professionals disagree.

Digital Keys: The Downsides

Digital keys have taken the market by storm and are definitely here to stay. They offer a host of benefits such as audit trails, simple rekeys, and ease of use. However, these advances aren’t without a few downsides:

  • Cost
  • Battery Life
  • Failure Rate

Both the locks that use digital keys, as well as the keys themselves, inevitably cost more than those that only use mechanical keys. The increased dollar signs alone are enough to encourage some organizations to opt for mechanical locks.

Another potential downside of digital keys is they must be physically charged or have the batteries changed on a regular basis. Imagine trying to get into your office only to find that your key is inoperable because it’s low on battery.

The final vulnerability of digital keys is the technology is more prone to failure than mechanical locks. Digital keys and the locks they operate are sometimes plagued by defective computer chips. In these instances, one cannot gain entry or secure the lock without a mechanical key override.

Mechanical Keys: They are Here to Stay

Because of the aforementioned downsides of digital keys, industry experts believe that, while the use digital keys will continue to rise, mechanical keys are here to stay. They are a safeguard against electronic failures and are easier to use.

As long as a lock functions properly, a mechanical key will always work—you don’t have the same risk for electronic failure. As such, many electronic locks will continue to offer mechanical key overrides. The LockNet director of business development, Elise Miller, says, “There will always be a need for at least one mechanical key per location, because there will always be at least one lock that needs an override. In other words, there will always be locks that need the most basic and simple operation—a key.”

Rob Owen, the LockNet director of national accounts-construction, is also on board with the idea mechanical keys are here to stay. “Digital keys are definitely here to stay, but by no means will they replace mechanical keys. First, some doors simply won’t need the sophistication of a digital key, and it would be a waste of money to install digital locks on these doors. Secondly, digital keys will always be plagued by a higher failure rate due to the ability for the computer chip to fail.”

As technology advances, digital keys will be increasingly refined and will be more of a mainstay in the market; however, the mechanical key is here to stay.

A version of this post originally appeared on the LockNet blog, LockBytes.

 

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